Tunisian video activists on BoingBoing

At ETech, a few weeks back, I had the pleasure of doing a video interview with Xeni Jardin. Xeni’s one of my very favorite journalists, in part because she’s passionate about both technology and the developing world – she’s travelled and reported extensively in Latin America and West Africa, and frequently brings topics up on BoingBoing that might not otherwise be included on a tech/pop culture/intellectual property/DIY blog.

Xeni wanted to feature some of the topics I talked about in my Cute Cats talk, but realized that it’s hard to summarize the entire talk in a short videocast. So we chose a small segment of the talk, about Tunisian video activism, and sat down in the hall of the conference hotel for a chat about propoganda, video activism, censorship and human rights.

And now it’s online. And pretty good, if I do say so myself. Feel free to go onto BoingBoing and tell Xeni you like it. Or whatever you really think about it.

I tend to feel like BoingBoing – along with Metafilter, and a couple of other sites – serve as a daily newspaper that’s read by both my activist friends and my tech geek friends. I can’t always be sure that my geekier friends are aware of the latest YouTube blockage in Pakistan or imprisoned blogger… just as I can’t be sure that my activist friends are up on the latest in giant squid news. But if it’s on BoingBoing, it’s in the popular imagination. As such, I’m grateful for Xeni’s pieces on subjects like Tunisian blogging, Zimbabwe election monitoring and other key topics. Oh, and for the occasional unicorn chaser.

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